11 February 2013

Angel Oak Tree - Johns Island

Angel Oak, Johns Island, S.C
We might not have a snowstorm but it is a drippy day to be entertaining visitors from Canada. I headed towards Johns Island during a break in the rain this morning and we were awed as always at the magnificence of Angel Oak tree. I did notice that they had placed signs on stands so as to make photos as almost any angle difficult. Rascals. Do you think they want to encourage us to buy the photographs in the gift shop?

Turns out the beautiful prints in the shop are by my friends Leah and Kathy. The salesmen said they were one of his most frequently purchased items.  Go ladies!
The Angel  Oak has come to symbolize Charleston.  It is a Southern live oak located in Angel Oak Park, on Johns Island near Charleston.  The Angel  Oak Tree is estimated to be in excess of 1500 years old, stands 66.5 ft  (20 m) tall, measures 28 ft (8.5 m) in circumference, and
produces shade that covers 17,200 square feet (1,600 m2). From tip to tip  Its longest branch distance is 187 ft.

The Angel Oak Tree is thought to  be one of the oldest living things in the country.  The land where the Angel Oak Tree stands was part of Abraham Waight's 1717 land grant.  The  City of Charleston now owns the property.  The Angel Oak Park is free and  the tree should be added to any visit to Charleston, Kiawah or Seabrook  Islands.


11 comments:

  1. You're hitting all the hot spots with your guests! I took some photos last year on a visit, and was mightily impressed with the tree. Quite remarkable!

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    1. Rain, rain, rain. Better than snow but it would be nice to get a sunny day.

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  2. Ps. You did a great job of avoiding the signs.

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  3. I think I have been here. Your folks must be having a great time seeing Charleston through your eyes.

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  4. What an amazing tree! I think I'll tip my California friend who is impressed by his redwoods!

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    1. We love this tree. It is an amazing thing to walk under those long limbs.

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  5. Anonymous1:33 PM

    I take all my visitors to see this magnificent tree. I am so afraid lightening will hit it before everyone in the world gets to see it. Pam D.

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  6. Joan, Your gray and cloudy day worked so well for your photos! I always am there on bright sunny afternoons with the sun behind the tree and can't get a good picture. I should have 'gone behind' the tree like you did. Awesome shots! I LOVE that tree!

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  7. Copy right infringement!!!

    Just let you know there has been a guy named Bryan Melton that has stolen one of these pictures as his own! He lives in Louisanna and screenshotted your photo and is trying to say he took it on his phone. Please contact me for more info! jwblant@gmail.com

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    Replies
    1. I knew someone had. Oddly enough someone I knew shared it on facebook and it had been shared over 800 times. That one was the bottom shot in the series. Thanks for looking out for me and letting me know.

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